Bio-Scapes

Anyone that appreciates the fusion of art and science will thoroughly enjoy the images and videos posted on the Olympus BioScapes website. The Olympus BioScapes Competition annually celebrates wonderful images and movies captured through microscopy. Entrants from about 70 countries submit about 2,500 images and movies to the competition each year. The Olympus BioScapes website offers up this year’s best photo- and video-microscopy of plants and animals. Here are a few of my favorite images and movies from the 2014 Olympus BioScapes Competition. The captions show the ranking in the competition, attribution, subject, and technique. See more extraordinary images and videos at the Olympus BioScapes website.

Images

2014 // 3rd // Dr. Igor Siwanowicz // HHMI Janelia Research Campus // Ashburn, VA, USA Specimen: Barnacle appendages that sweep plankton and other food into the barnacle's shell for consumption Technique: Confocal microscopy, 100x

3rd Place // Dr. Igor Siwanowicz // HHMI Janelia Research Campus // Ashburn, VA, USA // Specimen: Barnacle appendages that sweep plankton and other food into the barnacle’s shell for consumption // Technique: Confocal microscopy, 100x

2014 // 4th // Dr. Csaba Pintér // Keszthely, Hungary Specimen: Phyllobius roboretanus weevils Technique: Stereo microscopy

4th Place // Dr. Csaba Pintér // Keszthely, Hungary // Specimen: Phyllobius roboretanus weevils Technique: Stereo microscopy

Honorable Mention // Mr. Arturo Agostino // Scordino, Italy Specimen: Paramecium Technique: Differential interference contrast

Honorable Mention // Mr. Arturo Agostino // Scordino, Italy // Specimen: Paramecium // Technique: Differential interference contrast

Khodaverdi copy

Honorable Mention // Mrs. Masoumeh “Sahar” Khodaverdi // Tabriz University // East Azarbaijan, Iran, Islamic Republic // Specimen: Papaver sp. (poppy) floral primordium // Technique: Epi-illumination, 100 z-stacked images

Lavigne copy

Honorable Mention // Mr. Robert Lavigne // Montreal, Canada // Specimen: Diatom Coscinodiscus excavatus. The specimen diameter is 213 μm // Technique: Differential interference contrast (DIC)

Prior copy

Honorable Mention // Mr. Francis Prior // Liverpool, UK // Specimen: Jumping spider // Technique: Epi-illumination

Video

10th Place (tie) // Dr. Philipp Keller // HHMI Janelia Research Campus // Ashburn, VA, USA // Specimen: Neural activity in an entire zebrafish brain in vivo. The video, which shows fast 3D recordings of the entire larval brain (ca. 100,000 neurons), depicts, for the first time, an almost exhaustive view of single-neuron activity in the brain of a living vertebrate // Technique: Custom-built simultaneous multi-view light sheet microscopy

1st Place (tie) // Dr. William Lemon // HHMI Janelia Research Campus // Ashburn, VA, USA // Specimen: Multiple views of Drosophila embryonic development. This embryo was recorded in 30-second intervals over a period of 24 hours, starting three hours after egg laying. The video may help reveal cell lineages, cell differentiation and whole-embryo morphogenesis, essential aspects of developmental biology. The newly hatched larva begins to crawl off screen at the end of the video Technique: Custom-built simultaneous multi-view light sheet microscopy

Honorable Mention // Mr. Wim van Egmond // Berkel en Rodenrijs, The Netherlands
Specimen: Tardigrade (water bear) // Technique: Differential interference contrast, 25x

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